Title: Beat-Boxed.Dynamic Range in Photography
Dynamic range describes the ratio between the maximum and minimum measurable light intensities (think in terms of black and white). In the real world, one never encounters a true white or true black - only varying degrees of light source in tensity and the subjects reflectivity. The concept of dynamic range becomes more complicated, and depends on whether you are describing a capture device (camera/scanner), a display (monitor/screen), or the subject itself. Not to mention the human eye can actually perceive a greater dynamic range than is ordinarily possible with a camera.
When one talks about the dynamic range of a photo it can mean many things… from tones, lighting and color depth but for me I like to think of it as the overall finished presentations your image portrays to its audience. When people say “that image really pops!” it goes hand in hand with a good dynamic range.If you take photos, whether it’s for personal, hobby or profession I would recommend you take the time to dive into researching dynamic range. Make an assignment of it and practice it. You have nothing to loose, yet so much more to gain.
My 2 cents… take it or leave it!

Title: Beat-Boxed.

Dynamic Range in Photography

Dynamic range describes the ratio between the maximum and minimum measurable light intensities (think in terms of black and white). In the real world, one never encounters a true white or true black - only varying degrees of light source in tensity and the subjects reflectivity. The concept of dynamic range becomes more complicated, and depends on whether you are describing a capture device (camera/scanner), a display (monitor/screen), or the subject itself. Not to mention the human eye can actually perceive a greater dynamic range than is ordinarily possible with a camera.

When one talks about the dynamic range of a photo it can mean many things… from tones, lighting and color depth but for me I like to think of it as the overall finished presentations your image portrays to its audience. When people say “that image really pops!” it goes hand in hand with a good dynamic range.

If you take photos, whether it’s for personal, hobby or profession I would recommend you take the time to dive into researching dynamic range. Make an assignment of it and practice it. You have nothing to loose, yet so much more to gain.

My 2 cents… take it or leave it!

Title. The Beatdown.
10 Tips for Shooting Live Music/Concerts1. Know the show/artist. Do your research, the more you know the better you can predict the shots. If possible even go to one of the artists shows before you have to shoot it.2. Get there at least 1 Hour early, know the artists rules, stage rules and it doesn’t hurt to talk with a few of the shows technicians.|3. Ear plugs. I’ve learned the hard way on this one… they are always in my camera bag!4. Avoid lens changes during songs - you need to be prepared to shoot at a moments notice.5. Immediately back up your media/storage cards once you get home. A reshoot is out of the question.6. Take 2 days away from the photos - this clears your mind and helps you select the best images.7. Make sure to send the group/band or artist a few promo shots - get noticed.8. Know your camera, it’s settings - possible limitations and fully understand how it works.9. Use prime lenses.10. Your own dress code. Loud colors and flashy tones are not acceptable, you need to be able to blend not only on stage but in the crowd.  

Title. The Beatdown.


10 Tips for Shooting Live Music/Concerts

1. Know the show/artist. Do your research, the more you know the better you can predict the shots. If possible even go to one of the artists shows before you have to shoot it.
2. Get there at least 1 Hour early, know the artists rules, stage rules and it doesn’t hurt to talk with a few of the shows technicians.|
3. Ear plugs. I’ve learned the hard way on this one… they are always in my camera bag!
4. Avoid lens changes during songs - you need to be prepared to shoot at a moments notice.
5. Immediately back up your media/storage cards once you get home. A reshoot is out of the question.
6. Take 2 days away from the photos - this clears your mind and helps you select the best images.
7. Make sure to send the group/band or artist a few promo shots - get noticed.
8. Know your camera, it’s settings - possible limitations and fully understand how it works.
9. Use prime lenses.
10. Your own dress code. Loud colors and flashy tones are not acceptable, you need to be able to blend not only on stage but in the crowd.