Title: Movies in the Park.Outtake from a recent shoot at Ah-Nab-Awen Park in downtown Grand Rapids, Michigan. My assignment for ExperienceGR was to shoot a cityscape at night, while showcasing the people in the park.Of course, this posed some few “problems”… 1) Night shots/long exposures require just that a longer exposure, so I had to find a happy middle with people blurred to ambient lighting.2) The movie screen, again long exposure, but I made the best of it and down the road their design department can always insert any movie still in the space provided.3) The weather, mother nature works with you and sometimes against you - I made her cooperate even if she didn’t want to do so!Hope you enjoy!

Title: Movies in the Park.

Outtake from a recent shoot at Ah-Nab-Awen Park in downtown Grand Rapids, Michigan. My assignment for ExperienceGR was to shoot a cityscape at night, while showcasing the people in the park.

Of course, this posed some few “problems”…

1) Night shots/long exposures require just that a longer exposure, so I had to find a happy middle with people blurred to ambient lighting.

2) The movie screen, again long exposure, but I made the best of it and down the road their design department can always insert any movie still in the space provided.

3) The weather, mother nature works with you and sometimes against you - I made her cooperate even if she didn’t want to do so!

Hope you enjoy!

Title: Potty Break.I have a thing for photographing toilets… this location was like winning the lotto!

Title: Potty Break.

I have a thing for photographing toilets… this location was like winning the lotto!

Title: Air Force.Outtake from a recent shoot at Reynolds & Sons - Downtown, Grand Rapids, Michigan.Shot with a Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF 24-70mm f/2.8L lens, and off camera flash via sync-cord with a Canon 580 EX II Speedlite.

Title: Air Force.

Outtake from a recent shoot at Reynolds & Sons - Downtown, Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Shot with a Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF 24-70mm f/2.8L lens, and off camera flash via sync-cord with a Canon 580 EX II Speedlite.

Title: On the Move.
As a photographer… one thing you need to master early on is how perspective affects your photos.
So what is perspective? In geek terms it is the dimension of objections and their relationship to the space between them, or in easy terms it’s the way your eyes relate to the objects in an image. Example: The farther the object, the smaller it becomes. 
Another interesting thing that happens with perspective is how it plays with lines in your composition. Lines will look as if they are coming closer and closer together the farther away from your eyes and near vanish as they approach the horizon in the distance. Buildings tend to reach out, bend and distort as they jump towards the skyline.Because of everything mentioned above… perspective is one of the most important elements in photography and it is the secret key to any composition. As a photographer your relation perspective determines how a viewer is intended to see your photograph - it moves their eyes and helps instruct them what you want them not only to see, but feel in your photo.

Title: On the Move.

As a photographer… one thing you need to master early on is how perspective affects your photos.

So what is perspective? In geek terms it is the dimension of objections and their relationship to the space between them, or in easy terms it’s the way your eyes relate to the objects in an image. Example: The farther the object, the smaller it becomes. 

Another interesting thing that happens with perspective is how it plays with lines in your composition. Lines will look as if they are coming closer and closer together the farther away from your eyes and near vanish as they approach the horizon in the distance. Buildings tend to reach out, bend and distort as they jump towards the skyline.

Because of everything mentioned above… perspective is one of the most important elements in photography and it is the secret key to any composition. As a photographer your relation perspective determines how a viewer is intended to see your photograph - it moves their eyes and helps instruct them what you want them not only to see, but feel in your photo.

Title: High Fashion.I came across a memory card sitting at the bottom of a bag that I’ve not used since early summer of 2012… much to my surprise there were photos still on it!So what was on the card? and how is it possible that I didn’t miss them right away? Those are a few very good questions! However it happens to the best of photographers and it felt like I won the lottery when I discovered these recovered images.The SD-Card had just over 20 photos on it and images ranged from window display/reflection shots, streetscapes, street photography, and random items from around town. Upon examining the card further, and thanks to EXIF data, I came to the conclusion that the photos were taken while touring a group around downtown Grand Rapids.The photo above was one of the images and is a window display that much to my surprise included me in one of the reflections. So I guess that makes this find a win-win!Photo taken with a Fujifilm X100. Settings: Exposure 1/60th, Aperture f/4.0, Focal Length 23mm, ISO 640, and an Exposure Bias of -0.33 EV.

Title: High Fashion.

I came across a memory card sitting at the bottom of a bag that I’ve not used since early summer of 2012… much to my surprise there were photos still on it!

So what was on the card? and how is it possible that I didn’t miss them right away? Those are a few very good questions! However it happens to the best of photographers and it felt like I won the lottery when I discovered these recovered images.

The SD-Card had just over 20 photos on it and images ranged from window display/reflection shots, streetscapes, street photography, and random items from around town. Upon examining the card further, and thanks to EXIF data, I came to the conclusion that the photos were taken while touring a group around downtown Grand Rapids.

The photo above was one of the images and is a window display that much to my surprise included me in one of the reflections. So I guess that makes this find a win-win!

Photo taken with a Fujifilm X100. Settings: Exposure 1/60th, Aperture f/4.0, Focal Length 23mm, ISO 640, and an Exposure Bias of -0.33 EV.

Title: Trinketry.I feel like giving out a photography trick/tip today… I’m often asked: “How do you get your metals to look so metallic in your photos?” and that question is often followed up with “Can I have that preset?”So here you have it - my answers!
Q: How do you get your metals to look so metallic in your photos?A: I use a Polarizing Filter and almost always shoot with a Macro Lens to bring out the textures. A polarizer will help block out all unwanted light and bring the true sheen out of any metallic surface… they are not just for landscapes! Having said that; you need to shoot on an angle if you are going to use one of these filters on metallics… that way you will not take away some of the wanted reflections and highlights needed to give the photo depth. This is where “practice makes perfect” comes in to play.Q: Can I have that preset?A: If you have to ask that, see question 1. Secondly the more you process metallics the worse their outcome. Strive to shoot it right in camera with proper lighting, that will give you the optimal shine and surface textures. 

Title: Trinketry.

I feel like giving out a photography trick/tip today… I’m often asked: “How do you get your metals to look so metallic in your photos?” and that question is often followed up with “Can I have that preset?”

So here you have it - my answers!

Q: How do you get your metals to look so metallic in your photos?
A: I use a Polarizing Filter and almost always shoot with a Macro Lens to bring out the textures. A polarizer will help block out all unwanted light and bring the true sheen out of any metallic surface… they are not just for landscapes! Having said that; you need to shoot on an angle if you are going to use one of these filters on metallics… that way you will not take away some of the wanted reflections and highlights needed to give the photo depth. This is where “practice makes perfect” comes in to play.

Q: Can I have that preset?
A: If you have to ask that, see question 1. Secondly the more you process metallics the worse their outcome. Strive to shoot it right in camera with proper lighting, that will give you the optimal shine and surface textures. 

Title: Curly-Cues.What’s not to love about this photo? Enjoy the smile. 

Title: Curly-Cues.

What’s not to love about this photo? Enjoy the smile. 

Title: Merry Chr.I’m usually not too keen on Christmas imagery… BUT, I do love the softness and depth of field in this shot. Again - I love the windows at Minty Keen, great eye candy for goods and reflections! 

Title: Merry Chr.

I’m usually not too keen on Christmas imagery… BUT, I do love the softness and depth of field in this shot. Again - I love the windows at Minty Keen, great eye candy for goods and reflections! 

Title: Skating Through.I wish I would have taken this shot prior to my “Windows of Light” gallery show… might be my new favorite window/reflection shot to date. Window Location: Christmas/Holiday window at Minty Keen in Grand Rapids, Michigan. 

Title: Skating Through.

I wish I would have taken this shot prior to my “Windows of Light” gallery show… might be my new favorite window/reflection shot to date. 

Window Location: Christmas/Holiday window at Minty Keen in Grand Rapids, Michigan. 

Title: The Dead of Night.Today in celebration of Halloween I’m sharing a Zombie Portrait from this past weekend’s Zombie Dash in Grand Rapids, Michigan. What a blast… 400+ zombies and streets full of runners! When I look back on this portrait I instantly smile. Yes, a zombie chick made me smile. What I like most about this one is that I instantly recall how as she noticed me and my camera rig she went from a fierce and vicious zombie to a beautiful zombie gal with one amazing smile. She smile for only a few seconds and then went right back into character and went on her way of chasing down runners. Photo taken with a Canon EOS 5D Mark III, outfitted with an EF 24-70mm f/2.8L USM. As for the lighting - I was running around with a Vagabond Mini power pack and a single AlienBee 400 with a silver 22” beauty dish attached. 

Title: The Dead of Night.

Today in celebration of Halloween I’m sharing a Zombie Portrait from this past weekend’s Zombie Dash in Grand Rapids, Michigan. What a blast… 400+ zombies and streets full of runners! When I look back on this portrait I instantly smile. Yes, a zombie chick made me smile. What I like most about this one is that I instantly recall how as she noticed me and my camera rig she went from a fierce and vicious zombie to a beautiful zombie gal with one amazing smile. She smile for only a few seconds and then went right back into character and went on her way of chasing down runners. 

Photo taken with a Canon EOS 5D Mark III, outfitted with an EF 24-70mm f/2.8L USM. As for the lighting - I was running around with a Vagabond Mini power pack and a single AlienBee 400 with a silver 22” beauty dish attached.