Title: Morning Delights.PHOTOGRAPHING COFFEEYes I love coffee and I have probably taken more than my fair share of coffee photographs! Today’s blog outlines just a few things I think about when I try to get the “one perfect shot of coffee” over and over again.When I take the photo I always remember that I’m taking an image of the coffee and not the mug. Think about it, did you pay over $5 for the coffee or the mug? The correct answer is that you paid for the coffee! A good coffee photo should normally be shot it a clean white cup, or if your cup is of a darker color you want to make sure that the cup is lined white on the inside. Never use a flash - I repeat, never use a flash. Natural light (like by a window) gives the proper color to the coffee and accents the airiness and warmth of your coffees colors. When taking a picture try to keep the image as simple as possible. Too much in the picture is distracting. If you are taking a shot with food, try to make sure the coffee cup and plate are similar in color or contrasting. Finding the right angle is also important as you want not only to see depth with the coffee, but with you want to see the food just as much. Think of it in terms of product placement!If your goal is to get that steaming cup coffee shot you need to make sure you have a dark background. Want to know a trade secret? It also helps to have a clean cup preheated with boiling water to get this imagery. Practice makes perfect for this shot but always make sure you are set up on an angle and have your camera ready before the pour.If you are looking to capture the atmosphere of the coffee house, try to keep the image simple - a messy image will look just that messy, clean and simple is always a good thing! The end result of a coffee house shot is to capture the feel and mood of the establishment. It helps that you as the photographer are familiar with the coffee house. I would never promote stalking tendencies - but know your surroundings, baristas, and clientele. And last but not least - take your cup of coffee outside into the city! Outdoor coffee shots are always interesting. Again, you have to think about clean spaces as much as possible, unless you are looking to get a gritty result. Natural lighting is also key to outdoor coffee shots so be mindful where you place your cup of coffee. Remember that you are outdoors and that your shot will tell your viewer about locations. Because of this, think about your camera angle and incorporate landmarks, items and even streetscapes into your photo for added flair.Now get out there and shoot a cup of coffee today! 

 

Title: Morning Delights.

PHOTOGRAPHING COFFEE

Yes I love coffee and I have probably taken more than my fair share of coffee photographs! Today’s blog outlines just a few things I think about when I try to get the “one perfect shot of coffee” over and over again.

When I take the photo I always remember that I’m taking an image of the coffee and not the mug. Think about it, did you pay over $5 for the coffee or the mug? The correct answer is that you paid for the coffee! A good coffee photo should normally be shot it a clean white cup, or if your cup is of a darker color you want to make sure that the cup is lined white on the inside. Never use a flash - I repeat, never use a flash. Natural light (like by a window) gives the proper color to the coffee and accents the airiness and warmth of your coffees colors.
 

When taking a picture try to keep the image as simple as possible. Too much in the picture is distracting. If you are taking a shot with food, try to make sure the coffee cup and plate are similar in color or contrasting. Finding the right angle is also important as you want not only to see depth with the coffee, but with you want to see the food just as much. Think of it in terms of product placement!

If your goal is to get that steaming cup coffee shot you need to make sure you have a dark background. Want to know a trade secret? It also helps to have a clean cup preheated with boiling water to get this imagery. Practice makes perfect for this shot but always make sure you are set up on an angle and have your camera ready before the pour.

If you are looking to capture the atmosphere of the coffee house, try to keep the image simple - a messy image will look just that messy, clean and simple is always a good thing! The end result of a coffee house shot is to capture the feel and mood of the establishment. It helps that you as the photographer are familiar with the coffee house. I would never promote stalking tendencies - but know your surroundings, baristas, and clientele. 

And last but not least - take your cup of coffee outside into the city! Outdoor coffee shots are always interesting. Again, you have to think about clean spaces as much as possible, unless you are looking to get a gritty result. Natural lighting is also key to outdoor coffee shots so be mindful where you place your cup of coffee. Remember that you are outdoors and that your shot will tell your viewer about locations. Because of this, think about your camera angle and incorporate landmarks, items and even streetscapes into your photo for added flair.

Now get out there and shoot a cup of coffee today! 


 

Title: Deep-Six’d.My mantra for photography has always been “Everything Deserves to be Photographed”… nothing is too little, to damaged, or too small. Everything and everyone needs their time in the spotlight - even if it is just one moment in their life.I wanted to share this amazing and important article by Jonathan Mead titled "How to Find Beauty in Life".http://thinksimplenow.com/calmness/how-to-find-beauty-in-life/True, honest, humble words. A must read - please take the time to read his words today! 

Title: Deep-Six’d.

My mantra for photography has always been “Everything Deserves to be Photographed”… nothing is too little, to damaged, or too small. Everything and everyone needs their time in the spotlight - even if it is just one moment in their life.

I wanted to share this amazing and important article by Jonathan Mead titled "How to Find Beauty in Life".

http://thinksimplenow.com/calmness/how-to-find-beauty-in-life/

True, honest, humble words. A must read - please take the time to read his words today! 

Title: Cross-Indexed.Sharing a bit of street photography love today… enjoy! 

Title: Cross-Indexed.

Sharing a bit of street photography love today… enjoy! 

Title: Night Train.What is Ambient Lighting?In terms of photography and cinematography, ambient light (available light) refers to any light source that is not supplied by the photographer. Ambient light usually refers to sources of light that are already available naturally and excludes flashes, strobes or other artificial light sources. Examples of ambient light are windows, street lights, traffic, moonlight, etc.The use of ambient or natural light may pose a challenge for a photographer. The brightness and direction of the light is often not adjustable, except perhaps for indoor lighting on a dimmer. This limits the selection of shutter speeds and sometimes requires using a shade or reflector to manipulate the light. It can also influence the time, location, and even orientation of the photo shoot to obtain the desired lighting conditions.
Ambient light can often also produce a range of distinct colorations in your photographs. At times photos will tend to cast shades of blue, yellow or orange. While these discolorations can help set the mood - sometimes using a custom white balance is the photographer best defense to combat these awkward color shifts.Like all other aspects of photography, manipulating ambient (natural) light takes practice and an understanding of your camera’s settings. As always practice makes perfect… now go out and get moody with your photos!

Title: Night Train.

What is Ambient Lighting?

In terms of photography and cinematography, ambient light (available light) refers to any light source that is not supplied by the photographer. Ambient light usually refers to sources of light that are already available naturally and excludes flashes, strobes or other artificial light sources. Examples of ambient light are windows, street lights, traffic, moonlight, etc.

The use of ambient or natural light may pose a challenge for a photographer. The brightness and direction of the light is often not adjustable, except perhaps for indoor lighting on a dimmer. This limits the selection of shutter speeds and sometimes requires using a shade or reflector to manipulate the light. It can also influence the time, location, and even orientation of the photo shoot to obtain the desired lighting conditions.

Ambient light can often also produce a range of distinct colorations in your photographs. At times photos will tend to cast shades of blue, yellow or orange. While these discolorations can help set the mood - sometimes using a custom white balance is the photographer best defense to combat these awkward color shifts.

Like all other aspects of photography, manipulating ambient (natural) light takes practice and an understanding of your camera’s settings. As always practice makes perfect… now go out and get moody with your photos!

Title: Uncle Sam.When I think about Chicago I always think about the cities vast supply of street art and murals. Of course, one name that always comes to mind if the Jeff Zimmermann. I still remember my first introduction with his work as I wandered around the Pilsen Neighborhood… I guess you could say it was love at first sight. From his photo realistic portraits to his bold use of color, not to mention the stories his murals tell - I was hooked. I also take pride in the fact that I have not only met Jeff but have become friends with him, hell he even nicknamed me “TJ” and I proudly display one of his pieces of art on my wall. I’ve taken a lot out of my relationship with Jeff but the one thing that he constantly presses every time we meet up is that I need to always my own artist and to carry my passion through in everything I do. Wise, wise words in today’s art market. Oh, and he can go head to head with me in a margarita drinking marathon!Jeff Zimmermannwww.jazim.com 

Title: Uncle Sam.

When I think about Chicago I always think about the cities vast supply of street art and murals. Of course, one name that always comes to mind if the Jeff Zimmermann. I still remember my first introduction with his work as I wandered around the Pilsen Neighborhood… I guess you could say it was love at first sight. From his photo realistic portraits to his bold use of color, not to mention the stories his murals tell - I was hooked. I also take pride in the fact that I have not only met Jeff but have become friends with him, hell he even nicknamed me “TJ” and I proudly display one of his pieces of art on my wall. I’ve taken a lot out of my relationship with Jeff but the one thing that he constantly presses every time we meet up is that I need to always my own artist and to carry my passion through in everything I do. Wise, wise words in today’s art market. Oh, and he can go head to head with me in a margarita drinking marathon!

Jeff Zimmermann
www.jazim.com
 

Title: Word of Mouth.Photography + Public Transportation = Happiness. Well maybe happiness to me… this couple would not stop arguing the entire ride. Pretty sure whatever they were debating about it was totally his fault. 

Title: Word of Mouth.

Photography + Public Transportation = Happiness. Well maybe happiness to me… this couple would not stop arguing the entire ride. Pretty sure whatever they were debating about it was totally his fault. 

Title: Well-Read.Shooting From the Hip… 5 Candid Photography TipsHave you ever wondered how some street photographers “get that shot?” Have you heat the phrase “Shooting From the Hip” and wondered what that meant? Shooting From the Hip is a term used for a camera method where you, as the term implies, shoot from the hip. While most people think you randomly point and shoot your camera many street photographers use this principle and understand their cameras focal distance, the focal point of their lens, and have learned how to compose the shot without looking through the viewfinder.
At first, this technique can be a bit of a hit and miss (out of focus photos or subject’s not in the frame). However, with some practice, you’d get pretty good at it and produce some great looking shots.1. Use a fast lens. I know I must sound like a broken record but a prime lens is ideal as it’s less noticeable and more lightweight to carry. Think 24mm, 35mm or 50mm.2. Get close to your subject. The more expression or detail you see, the more your subject will be able to tell a story.3. Set to an AutoFocus. AF can track your moving subject and focus accordingly. Your camera will lock onto the subject and adjust the focus accordingly, helping to produce a clearer image.4. Set smaller aperture. A smaller aperture means more chance that your subject will be focused. When I shoot from the hip I normally have mine set between f/4.0 – 6.0. Again, the smaller the aperture, the more your subject will be in focus. Remember, smaller aperture = larger f-stop number.5. Start walking and shooting. If you feel up to this challenge, hit the streets and take photos! At first you might take 50 shots and only end up with 1-2 photo that shows up in focus and in frame, but trust me, that photo will be brilliant. Pay attention to how far away and your orientation to the subjects that you were shooting. As I’ve stated before… this is the key to mastering Shooting From the Hip.

Title: Well-Read.

Shooting From the Hip… 5 Candid Photography Tips

Have you ever wondered how some street photographers “get that shot?” Have you heat the phrase “Shooting From the Hip” and wondered what that meant? Shooting From the Hip is a term used for a camera method where you, as the term implies, shoot from the hip. While most people think you randomly point and shoot your camera many street photographers use this principle and understand their cameras focal distance, the focal point of their lens, and have learned how to compose the shot without looking through the viewfinder.

At first, this technique can be a bit of a hit and miss (out of focus photos or subject’s not in the frame). However, with some practice, you’d get pretty good at it and produce some great looking shots.

1. Use a fast lens.
I know I must sound like a broken record but a prime lens is ideal as it’s less noticeable and more lightweight to carry. Think 24mm, 35mm or 50mm.

2. Get close to your subject. 
The more expression or detail you see, the more your subject will be able to tell a story.

3. Set to an AutoFocus. 
AF can track your moving subject and focus accordingly. Your camera will lock onto the subject and adjust the focus accordingly, helping to produce a clearer image.

4. Set smaller aperture. 
A smaller aperture means more chance that your subject will be focused. When I shoot from the hip I normally have mine set between f/4.0 – 6.0. Again, the smaller the aperture, the more your subject will be in focus. Remember, smaller aperture = larger f-stop number.

5. Start walking and shooting. 
If you feel up to this challenge, hit the streets and take photos! At first you might take 50 shots and only end up with 1-2 photo that shows up in focus and in frame, but trust me, that photo will be brilliant. Pay attention to how far away and your orientation to the subjects that you were shooting. As I’ve stated before… this is the key to mastering Shooting From the Hip.

Title: Sitting Tight.Shooting Reflections… My Favorite Pastime.Photographing reflections, or as I like to call them Terryflections, begs for a huge depth of field (DOF). You want a mix of sharp focal points, silky smooth areas, and eye grabbing content in the photograph. When shooting reflections I always choose Aperture Priority mode with an aperture of f/4.0 or smaller. I also suggest using the lowest ISO setting that allows you to achieve a shutter speed of about 1/50 of a second or faster. A wide-angle lens, and I suggest that it is a prime lens (fixed focal length), lets you capture the big picture and my focal length of choice is normally 24mm and 35mm.
I have always been drawn to reflections in windows and in many ways they remind me of multiple exposure shots from the days of film. I also enjoy the story that they tell and how the viewers reaction can change with every item their eyes take in. When I see a reflection that catches my eye, I move around until I can see part of the reflection and part of what’s behind the window and then I take the picture. As I’ve stated before it is all about building a story in these shots - reflections need to be aligned right and composition is key, and as I always say “practice makes perfect!”

Title: Sitting Tight.

Shooting Reflections… My Favorite Pastime.

Photographing reflections, or as I like to call them Terryflections, begs for a huge depth of field (DOF). You want a mix of sharp focal points, silky smooth areas, and eye grabbing content in the photograph. When shooting reflections I always choose Aperture Priority mode with an aperture of f/4.0 or smaller. I also suggest using the lowest ISO setting that allows you to achieve a shutter speed of about 1/50 of a second or faster. 
A wide-angle lens, and I suggest that it is a prime lens (fixed focal length), lets you capture the big picture and my focal length of choice is normally 24mm and 35mm.

I have always been drawn to reflections in windows and in many ways they remind me of multiple exposure shots from the days of film. I also enjoy the story that they tell and how the viewers reaction can change with every item their eyes take in. When I see a reflection that catches my eye, I move around until I can see part of the reflection and part of what’s behind the window and then I take the picture. As I’ve stated before it is all about building a story in these shots - reflections need to be aligned right and composition is key, and as I always say “practice makes perfect!”

Title: Religionism.I will never tire of photographing reflections in store windows… I especially love how iconic this one came out. Thought I’d share. 

Title: Religionism.

I will never tire of photographing reflections in store windows… I especially love how iconic this one came out. Thought I’d share.